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August 01, 2006

An Ongoing Tradition, New Month, New Open Comments & Suggestions Post

My long standing tradition, since my Blog that preceded this one is to start every month with an abusive note about letting all my readers pose questions about matters of substance or trivial matters, request information, etc. etc.

I typically abuse or ignore all such mendiants, but tradition is what it is.

Posted by The Lounsbury at August 1, 2006 04:40 PM
Filed Under: Blog Notes - Admin

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Comments

What are your thoughts on this?

Posted by: Ali K at August 1, 2006 05:21 PM

That should be this.

Posted by: Ali K at August 1, 2006 05:24 PM

None, why?

Posted by: The Lounsbury at August 1, 2006 06:51 PM

Clearly L is an imposter whose day job actually involves selling flower-print sofas and bedroom sets of excellent value

Ah, I am crushed.

Posted by: eerie [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 1, 2006 06:58 PM

Kha.

Actually to my knowledge the eponymous Lounsbury is in fact related to me, although the company has fuck all to do with the family.

Posted by: The Lounsbury at August 1, 2006 07:20 PM

What do you think of Spengler's hawkish schemes for solving all problems in the Middle East?

I find this guy quite delusional at times, but he is at his most interesting when using demographics, such as his article on Iran's imperial ambitions...

Posted by: Frandroid Atreides at August 1, 2006 09:23 PM

I have the most amusing mental image of a Bond-esque man in a suit with dark sunglasses, gently pressing his fingers into a mattress and explaining the benefits of individually wrapped coils to a rapt soccer mom...

(yes it's a slow day)

Posted by: eerie [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 1, 2006 09:30 PM

so L is related to a man who runs a furnature website. fascinating.

Posted by: drdougfir [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 1, 2006 10:12 PM

"he is at his most interesting when using demographics, such as his article on Iran's imperial ambitions."

All this talk about demographics has been around for a long time. Your health would be best served by reading it from a less jingoistic source. One that contains the priceless: "Islamic traditional society is so fragile that it crumbles as soon as women learn to read."

Posted by: Ali K at August 1, 2006 10:21 PM

I can see this as Lounsbury's new logo.

Posted by: Ali K at August 1, 2006 10:24 PM

I find Spengler quite amusink to read. He sounds like a general in a bunker deep below Pentagon, pushing curved arrows on a map of the world. I liked that about the African Christians who were going to destroy Mecca...due to demographics. Gems like these:

Israel's strongest move on the chessboard would be a massive armored incursion into Lebanon to crush Hezbollah combined with limited strikes against Syria.

If Iran could bottle up the Strait of Hormuz, through which two-fifths of world oil exports pass, the position of the world economy might become desperate, but it is likely that the US 7th Fleet could prevent this.

This will not be the first time in history that a power with a potentially winning position frittered away its advantage by inaction. Germany in the First Morocco Crisis of 1905 comes to mind, when the opportunity arose to crush France at a moment when Russia was paralyzed by revolution and Britain had no interest in intervening.

Wonder if he's been playing too much Axis & Allies.

Posted by: Klaus [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 1, 2006 10:34 PM

speaking of computer games, did you ever get C&C Generals, L? i'd love to play a round with the aqoulites.

Posted by: drdougfir [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 1, 2006 10:37 PM

AHem: so L is related to a man who runs a furnature website. fascinating.

I am to the best of my knowledge (due to certain relatives who publish geneologies) related to the man who almost a century ago gave the firm its name. The firm is no longer, to my knowledge, connected with the family, although I can claim no direct knowledge.

Posted by: The Lounsbury at August 1, 2006 11:19 PM

so, in other words, your dreams of a furnature empire were crushed long before you were born.

Posted by: drdougfir [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 1, 2006 11:20 PM

Yes.

As were our ice businesses. The whole refridgerator revolution really fucked that into a cocked hat.

Posted by: The Lounsbury at August 1, 2006 11:30 PM

BTW, re your engineer question. Are you in petrochem?

Posted by: The Lounsbury at August 1, 2006 11:40 PM

sadly, no. mech engr with focus in pneumatics, robotics, automation, etc... toying with getting an MS in petroengr though.

Posted by: drdougfir [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 1, 2006 11:42 PM

Hmmm, crossovers surely.

What do you know about petro-services firms? E.g. Schlumberger.

Posted by: The Lounsbury at August 2, 2006 12:00 AM

nothing i couldn't learn.

to date i've been in design houses and manufacturing facilities for hi and low-tech production (along the lines of: LCD monitors, class 5-8 heavy trucks, test equipment for electronic components, marble tile, humanoid robotic systems). I've done some sysadmin stuff for small research offices. i also used to build show-bots (think disneyland on steroids and with more malace).

looking for something starting around june when my current assignment finishes.

Posted by: drdougfir [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 2, 2006 12:07 AM

You think it's fair to say US handling of the Lebanon debacle has been even more of a disaster than Iraq?

As I see it, Iraq simply confirmed what people in the region already suspected of the US: it was run by oil-hungry imperialists perfectly willing to kill women and kids in order to subjugate Iraq. But hey, regional observers probably could've told you that much from the sanctions regime and low-intensity air war against Iraq during the 1990s. The botched invasion just put an exclamation mark on all that.

In Lebanon, on the other hand, we've made a whole new ugly name for ourselves. Sure, Washington's reconfirmed old stereotypes--it turns out that we really do let the Israelis get away with anything, and that in return they really are our direct proxy army. (What other conclusion is to be expected when we respond to the crisis by ramping up arms shipments to the Tzahal? Hell, if Washington caught Syria or Iran doing that for Hizbullah...) But much worse, Lebanon reinforces an ugly observation that probably only started to become clear during the Dubai Ports World thing: the US just doesn't like Arabs. No Arab nation, regardless of how much it risks for US interests, can ever really count the US safeguarding its own interests in return.

Before, Arab critics of the US might have blasted regional governments that sold out to Washington, but those critics (and certainly those governments) were probably pretty confident that selling out would at least keep them from being attacked by Washington or Washington's Israeli proxy. After Lebanon... not so much.

Iraq showed that the US could be brutal towards its Arab enemies. Lebanon has shown that the US can be just as brutal towards its Arab "friends."


Posted by: Publius at August 2, 2006 03:02 AM

Didn't you pause to wonder why those who dislike Arabs/Muslims the most were those in favour of the invasion? It's about killing the enemy, not liberating him.

Though Iraq is a case of Arab killing Arab more than anything else. But that is an internal matter, unlike foreign invaders like Israel and NATO. Yes, that was sarcasm.

Posted by: Klaus [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 2, 2006 04:38 AM

Trust me, you don't need to convince me that the Iraq is an absolute catastrophe. That's why it took me so long to realize that, as far as the US is concerned, the war in Lebanon may be even worse.

Posted by: Publius at August 2, 2006 05:02 AM

As to the question:
You think it's fair to say US handling of the Lebanon debacle has been even more of a disaster than Iraq?
I don't know that the comparison makes sense.

Without Iraq, I would say no, by itself, no.

But with Iraq, it intensifies. The US is not the driver, but the catalyst in this sense.

It does reveal the utter bankruptcy and incompetence of this American administration. Breathtakingly bad, without partisan whinging on, really breathtakingly incompetent.

The sole value is to illustrate the utter bankruptcy of the "what if" approach of the group of Bolshy-thinking right ideologues typically labelled Neo-Con.

Posted by: The Lounsbury at August 3, 2006 10:39 AM

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